The Idiot’s Guide to the History of French Wine

The French are well known for their fabulous food, extraordinary fashion, and of course their wine. The history of French wine is nothing to shake French_beaujolais_red_wine_bottle history of french winea fist at, and is far too extensive to include every detail in a single blog post. But, alas, in order to be a true wino you must know a bit about French wine and where it came from.

Origination of French Wine

Experts have traced the roots of French wine all the way back to 2,600 years ago in Massalia. While the French today take great pride in their wine selection, in the 6th century it was a luxury only available to the rich. The Romans greatly influenced ancestors of the French to cultivate wine via Viticulture. This influence led to some of the most well known wineries in Champagne, Burgundy, Bordeaux, and Rhone.

The English influence on French Wine

The English and the Dutch were some of the first trading partners France had, and they played a major role in the type of grapes and wine that the French grew. Interestingly, before the French Revolution the Catholic Church was one of the country’s largest vineyard owners. These exterior factors helped breed the taste of French wine that we enjoy today.

Modern French Wine

During the late 20th and early 21st centuries a major change in the production of French wine started taking place. A global marketplace emerged onto the scene and competition for Spain, Italy, and the Americas directly affected the amount of wine France sold. After the World Wars, France took a renewed look at how to improve their wine production and capitalize on their previous success. Today, France is still a serious contender in wine making and is often the standard to which all other vineyards are held to. Other younger wine making countries do well to learn from the history of French wine.

Learn more about wine so you don’t have to look like an “Idiot”Wine CoverThe Prepared Idiot

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